Ethnicity Reports in Your DNA Do Offer Genealogy Clues

I have already done DNA testing on my mother and her brother. Both tested at Family Tree DNA and I really have been one to ignore the Ethnicity reports. But read on as there are clues given in those reports that can be very telling.

I recently asked my mother’s sister to also take a DNA test. Overkill? Well, maybe but I did hear from DNA experts that to get a better picture of the parents it is worthwhile to get three siblings to test if you are able. My mother has four siblings that are still with us so I was very pleased that her sister agreed to take the test.

I decided to test with Ancestry, and not because of the amazing analysis features offered, but because of the number of testers they have, 7 million! My aunt’s results arrived and nothing jumped out at me at first but yesterday I was looking at her matches and there was a group that wasn’t matching her siblings. I looked at each match individually to see if they had trees and sure enough there were two trees that caught my attention. The surname Stickle/Stickles appeared in their trees. STICKLE – are you really kidding me?

Anna Eliza Stickle was my mother’s great-grandmother, we know very little about her before she was in Canada. Anna and her husband Lewis had three children in the USA before settling in Etobicoke, Ontario. The family first appears in the 1852 Canadian census, further information was gleaned on the family from the 1861 census which asked married during the year and the enumerator actually put the year of marriage! 1836.

Anna married Lewis Harrop from Manchester, England, the couple moved to Canada between 1843-1849, as their son John was born in N.Y. in ’43 and daughter Mary in Canada in ’49. William Lewis was their last child and my ancestor.

Lewis died in 1861 and is buried at St. George’s-On-The-Hill Cemetery in Islington with no headstone to mark his grave. Anna remained a widow the rest of her life. Anna Eliza lived with her family until her passing in 1907 in Orangeville, Dufferin Co., Ontario.

For years descendants of Anna have been on a search for her family. Now DNA is pointing us in a direction. The Stickle DNA matches that have trees show the family lived in Dutchess, New York and the origins of the Stickles before coming to the USA is Amsterdam!!

How exciting, after years and I mean years of researching Irish records I now have a new place to explore and learn about.

A peek at my Aunts ethnicity report also seems to support her inheriting more of Anna Stickle’s DNA  –Screen_Shot_2018-03-16_at_7_52_53_PM_1


The New York Settlers ethnicity breakdown is NOT found in either her sister or brother’s DNA results!

Next, I will be researching the locations that the DNA matches have for their Stickle/s family in New York. I hope they have good Methodist records for B/M/D. Seriously though, how cool – Amsterdam!

A new place to add to my list of locations for a ‘family holiday’, good thing my kids don’t read my blog!

And I will be paying a little closer attention to the Ethnicity reports in the future! And test your Aunts and Uncles they may have the clue you need.

52 Ancestors: #9 Elizabeth (Harrop) Young


Elizabeth was the daughter of Anna Eliza Stickle and Lewis Harrop. She was born on February 20th, 1840 in New York, later moving with her parents to Islington, York Co., Ontario and then to Orangeville, Ontario. She married William Young in 1877 in England, the son of Robert and Mary Young. His first wife Isabella had died, leaving William with 4 young children.
1) Isabella b. 1866 in England married John Henry Bradshaw in Orangeville, Ontario in 1887.
2) John William Young b. 1869
3) Robert Young b. 1871 said to have died as a young man.
4) Mary A. Young b. 1875 married Herbert Winnett in 1905 in Vancouver. Mary died in 1954 in Oakville, Ontario.

William Young and his new wife Elizabeth had 3 children –
1) Elizabeth b. 1880 m. Michael Redmond
2) William Lewis b. 1882 m. Elizabeth Mays and lived in Edmonton, AB.
3) Sarah Jane b. 1887 m. Wesley Spafford and lived in B.C.

The 1881 census for Orangeville, Ontario shows the Young family along with Elizabeth’s mother Anna living in the same house. William Young’s death in 1888 left his wife with seven children.

Orangeville Sun

A Respected Citizen Gone
Death Robbed Orangeville of one of its most respected citizens last week in the person of Mr. Wm. Young, gardner, who passed away at his residence on Bythia street on Friday after a brief illness. Deceased was 44 years of age and leaves a widow and seven children. The funeral took place to the town cemetery on Sunday, and was largely attended.

I have often wondered what Elizabeth did to support herself and her children, the 1891 census does not list Elizabeth as having an occupation. In the 1901 census she is listed as 61 and a gardener, maybe there was a family business – something to investigate!

Elizabeth buried her mother Anna in 1907, they had never been apart.

In 1921 Elizabeth is now living with her daughter Elizabeth (Young) Redmond. she had married Michael Redmond. Their home in Weston, Ontario would have been full, with three adults and six children.

Elizabeth Young passed away on September 4, 1907 at the age of 80 years. She is buried in Riverside Cemetery.