1926 Prairie Province Census Index Released by Family Search

Breaking news, Family Search has added the index for the 1926 Canadian Prairie Province Census.

Some of the indexes are linked to the images, but not all. If the image is there it will appear on the right side if no image appears, there are a couple of steps to take to find it.

  1. Use this link to get to the index Canada, Prairie Provinces Census, 1926
  2. Once you find a record you would like to view click the icon circled belowScreen_Shot_2019-02-25_at_6_19_44_PM

The next screen is this

3. click the tab and it will give you this information

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The information below will appear

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4. Record the above number is the film number you will need to find and the image number, you will need to record this down as you will need this information. Here is the link you will need to use to get to the list of the films for the 1926 Canadian Prairie Census.

Enjoy people!

Browse the 1926 Canadian Prairie Census NOW

The number of people that are interested in the release of the 1926 Prairie census is telling by the amount of people that look at my posts about it.

I had to let you know, we now have access to the census. They have added the Canadian 1926 Prairie census to their catalog at Family Search. (Thanks for the heads up and thorough post by Gail Dever).

The index is coming but for the time being, you can have a look and see if you can find the people you have been waiting for.

Here are the first few lines for Saskatchewan, as you can see the census is easy to read.

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The weather is so cold I guess it is great timing as there is little else I can do other than look through a census page by page.

As I work my way through the census I decided to create a sharable doc on Google Sheets that people can add to. This doc with help us to share the locations in the census of communities.

 

 

You Can Help Index the 1926 Canadian Census

I have been a little focused (alright obsessed) with the potential release of the 1926 Canadian prairie census. After writing some posts about it I have realized that I (and you) can index the census!

It is available as an indexing project at Family Search, I just was on their site and checked.

How do you find it? Log into your Family Search account and select the ‘Indexing‘ tab at the top of the page.Screen Shot 2018-09-08 at 10.21.21 AM.png

Under Project Name select Canada and BINGO you are there!

I know what I will be spending my nights doing. The sooner it is indexed it is likely the sooner we will have access!

I do wonder why this has not been announced by Library and Archives Canada to encourage people to get involved?

Hold On To Your Hats, The Census is Coming

I have written two previous blog posts about the release of the 1926 Canadian census that covers the western prairie Provinces.

1926 Census to be Released this Year & 1926 Census When – No One Knows

The information on Library and Archives Canada website about the ’26 census has not changed but we are not completely in the dark as to what is going on.

I am happy to report that someone does know. A comment on my blog indicates that the census has been passed to Family Search and their transcribers are working their magic to get the census in our hands.

Nancy states they are indexing

“Name, land description, relationship to head, sex, marital condition, age, place of birth (province if Canada, or Country) ethnicity and year of immigration. Not being indexed is Father’s place of birth and Mother’s place of birth, year of naturalization, mother tongue, and education.”

This is amazing news and thankfully Nancy took the time to give us an update. Hopefully, we will have access to this soon!

A big Canadian thank you to Nancy and all the indexers at Family Search!

 

1926 Canadian Census to be Released this Year

Update: Hold on To Your Hats, The Census is Coming

92 years ago there was a census taken in Western Canada, and it is due to be released this year. The 1926 census covered the Western Provinces of Canada; Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan. The census was taken on June 1, 1926, more information on the census can be found on the Government of Canada website. 

Wikipedia reports the population of Canada in 1926 was 9,451,000, but it doesn’t state what the population was in those three provinces.

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I am still looking for the information that was asked in this census. I also have not been able to uncover the release date for the census.

In preparation, I am creating a list of surnames and places that will be of interest for my family history.

My search will include the following surnames:

Harrop – Balcarres, Saskatchewan, Alberta & Manitoba
Stewart – Yorkton, Saskatchewan
McRae – Alberta

My husband’s family –

Greber – Saskatchewan
Hawkesworth – Alberta
Hodgson – Saskatchewan
Schinkle – Manitoba
Schielke – Manitoba & Saskatchewan
Whitman – Saskatchewan & Alberta
Wiesner – Saskatchewan & Manitoba

And who knows who else will show up once I begin hunting!

Do you think it will be indexed upon release or shortly thereafter? I checked the Library and Archives website but I didn’t find any mention of the release date or if there is an indexing project in place.

I would recommend in preparation for the census release creating your own list, and share it!

Who will you be searching for?

Alberta AGS Conference Day 1

I am attending AGS Conference this weekend in Edmonton and I have thoroughly enjoyed the first day. They have provided us with a great line-up of speakers, it has been wonderful reconnecting with people, meeting new friends and so much learning. DNA has been the biggest hit for attendees with topics covering all aspects and levels.

Being days away from a trip to Ireland meant Ruth Blair’s talk on Preparing for a Genealogical Trip in 7 Steps was a great session to attend. It also has me with a few last-minute To-Dos.

Organizing Your Genetic Genealogy by Diahan Southard inspired me to sit in my room after the banquet working on my DNA spreadsheet.

Today has Kyle Betit is giving the opening Keynote and I will be attending his later session on Advances in Irish Research.

A surprise for me during the AGM was hearing my name announced and being presented with an award for an article I had written for our local genealogy society. I tend to not have a lot of confidence with my writing and I found this encouraging.

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I guess I will keep writing!

Bring on Day 2.

How to Find Alberta Vital Records

Alberta has a bad rap for genealogical records, but it isn’t the black hole of the West as most people think. Well maybe isn’t as easy as its counterparts like Saskatchewan Vital Records or Manitoba but the records are there.

Vital records are available at the Provincial Archives (PAA) for

  • Births that are over 120 years (not adoptions
  • Stillbirths over 75 years
  • Marriage over 75 years
  • Deaths over 50 years

If you are looking for more recent records here is the link for more information on the Service Alberta web page.

Here is the process I used to get a record for a relative who was married in Edmonton in 1908.  The first thing I did was go to the Provincial Archives of Edmonton webpage and located the Genealogy tab.

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Once I selected the Genealogy tab I scrolled down to the b/m/d pdfs on the page to determine if there was a specific number I should be locating. I have to admit I did find this process a little tedious and confusing. In the end, I contacted PAA via email explaining what I was searching for, the names of the people, the date (I only knew the year) and the location.

I received an email from them stating that they had received my request and they would be in touch. A follow-up e-mail told me they had located the marriage record and asked if I would like them to mail it or come in and view it in their reading room. I replied that they should mail it, a digital copy was not given as an option.

Another email followed that included a link to pay for the record and they

accept Visa, Visa debit, MasterCard and AMEX. We are also not able to accept credit card information over the phone to make payments.

The cost for the record is minimal – $3.00 ($6.00 if outside of Canada) and photocopying fee of $.35-$.50 cents! Not bad Alberta, not bad at all.

If you have relatives in Alberta and have been putting off ordering Vital Records, I would like to encourage you to go for it. Overall the process to access the records is not difficult and as you can see full of information! Well, they call them VITAL records for a reason!

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Marriage record of William Lewis Young and Emily Mays at The Manse in Edmonton, Alberta 26 August 1908.